Cocker Spaniel Poodle Mix – The Cockapoo

The Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix is a mix of a Cocker Spaniel and a Miniature or Toy Poodle, and these dogs are often referred to as the Cockapoo, Cockapoodle, Cockerpoo, or the Cockerdoodle. Like the two parents, these dogs are generally very happy and affectionate, so they can make a great addition to the home of young families or older individuals looking for a nice companion. Since hybrids can take on characteristics of either parent, it’s important to learn more about these dogs before you decide you want one of your own. Learn more about the Cockapoo by taking a closer look at their history, temperament, appearance, grooming needs, and health information.

Origin and History

Unlike many other designer or hybrid dogs, we actually know a fair amount about the origin and history of the Cockapoo. These dogs were actually bred before designer dogs became popular and trace all the way back to the 1960s. The goal of breeding the Poodle and Cocker Spaniel together was to create a dog that loved people and had a sweet temperament. Breeders also wanted to breed a dog that didn’t need quite as much grooming as the Poodle. Breeders worked to create a hybrid that was healthy, hypoallergenic, and very sweet. Currently there are some clubs that have been formed for the Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix, since it’s been around for such a long time. We can learn even more about the Cockerpoo by looking at the history of both parent breeds: The Cocker Spaniel and the Poodle.

The Cocker Spaniel traces back to Spain, and the Cocker Spaniel got its name because it did such a great job hunting woodcocks. These dogs were not recognized officially in America until the late 1800s, just after they showed up in the United States. Eventually the breed broke off into an American and an English breed, with breeds having a few different characteristics. Today the American Cocker Spaniel is a bit smaller than the English Cocker Spaniel and they are recognized as two different breeds by Kennel Clubs today.

The Poodle has a long history and was originally bred to help with hunting waterfowl. Although it’s thought that the Poodle’s origins go back to Germany, they became popular and distinct in France. Three different sizes of Poodles are bred, including Standard, Miniature, and Toy. While the Standard and Miniature sizes are considered working dogs, the Toy Poodle was bred merely to be a companion dog, and these dogs became quite popular among French aristocracy. They didn’t arrive in England until the mid 1800s, and they wouldn’t show up in America until the late 1800s. Usually the Miniature or Toy sized Poodles are bred with the Cocker Spaniel to create the Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix.

Appearance

Usually you can expect your Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix to be somewhere between 10 and 14 inches in height, and they’ll weigh in between 6 and 20 pounds, depending on if the Poodle used in breeding was a Toy or a Miniature Poodle. Cockerpoo dogs usually have a long, single layer coat that can range between loose curls and straight. They come in many different color combinations, including white, silver, brown, tan, black, and red. The Cockapoo has soulful eyes and long ears, and they have a compact, sturdy body.

Cockapoo Temperament

The Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix has a very happy temperament, and these dogs are also very smart. They are outgoing and usually get along great with just about everyone. They’re easy to please, and they’ll love snuggling up with you or playing together. The Cockapoo has the brains of the Poodle and the sweetness of the Cocker Spaniel. When you socialize and train these dogs early, you can further bring out these good characteristics. Of course, since they love to be around people, it’s important to avoid leaving them alone for long periods, since they may have separation anxiety, which can result in destructive behavior.

The activity needs of your Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix will depend on his size, but they usually have a moderate amount of energy. Smaller dogs may only need short walks and some playtime, while larger ones may need longer walks, a jog, and outdoor playtime. Cockapoo dogs will enjoy walking, heading to the dog park, running, swimming, and playing games like fetch.

Since Cockapoo dogs are very smart like the Poodle, they usually train very quickly and easily. However, the Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix gets some sensitivity from the Cocker side, so you need to be gentle and avoid harsh methods during training. With rewards, praise, and treats, they’ll learn very fast. Early training is also essential, so begin training and socialization as soon as you get your puppy.

Grooming

The Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix sheds very little if any at all and they don’t have a strong odor either. Since they usually have a long coat, you will still want to brush them daily to eliminate debris and prevent matting. Cockapoo dogs often need to have their hair professionally clipped, and it’s especially important to keep their hair out of their eyes. If you’re not experienced doing their nails, you can have a professional groomer take care of that too. Only bathe these dogs as needed and make sure their ears are checked and cleaned weekly.

Working Roles

Usually the Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix is a companion dog and is not used in any working roles.

Health

The Cocker Spaniel has a long life expectancy of between 12 and 15 years, as does the Poodle, so you can expect your Cockapoo to live between 12 and 15 years as well. These dogs have the potential to inherit any of the potential breed health concerns from both parents, although hybrids are usually much healthier than the pure bred parents are. Some of the possible health concerns that have the potential to affect your Cocker Spaniel Poodle mix include:

  • Patellar luxation
  • Entropion
  • Intervertebral disc disease
  • Skin disorders
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Cataracts
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia
  • Allergies
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Chondrodysplasia
  • Pulmonic stenosis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Epilepsy
  • Ear infections
  • Progressive retinal atrophy
  • Cancer
  • Ectropion
  • Corneal ulceration
  • Hemophilia
  • Patent ductus arteriosus
  • Endocarditis
  • Keratoconjunctivitis sicca
  • Cherry eye
  • Addison’s disease
  • Juvenile renal disease
  • Bloat
  • Sebaceous adenitis

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